Tour de France

 

Pursuit of the Yellow Jersey, or the Tour de France. The greatest bicycle tour of modern times. The original concept of a race through the country, broken into stages and based on cumulative time, has remained intact, since 1903.

The Idea: modeled after a six-day track race, Tour de France cyclists would leave the confines of a velodrome and instead loop around the entire country of France.

The Outcome: one of the greatest sporting events of the year.


 

Tour de France - Past Winners

Tour de France - Past Winners

Year

Winner

Nationality

1903

Cesar Garin

France

1904

Henri Cornet

France

1905

Louis Trousselier

France

1906

Rene Pottier

France

1907

Lucien Petit-Breton

France

1908

Lucien Petit-Breton

France

1909

Francois Faber

Luxembourg

1910

Octave Lapize

France

1911

Gustave Garrigou

France

1912

Odile Defraye

Begium

1913

Phillippe Thys

Belgium

1914

Phillippe Thys

Belgium

1915

No Tour

World War I

1916

No Tour

World War I

1917

No Tour

World War I

1918

No Tour

World War I

1919

Firmin Lambot

Belgium

1920

Phillippe Thys

Belgium

1921

Leon Scieur

Belgium

1922

Firmin Lambot

Belgium

1923

Henri Pelissier

France

1924

Ottavio Bottecchia

Italy

1925

Ottavio Bottecchia

Italy

1926

Lucien Buysse

Belgium

1927

Nicolas Frantz

Luxembourg

1928

Nicolas Frantz

Luxembourg

1929

Maurice De Waele

Belgium

1930

Andre Leducq

France

1931

Antonin Magne

France

1932

Andre Leducq

France

1933

Georges Speicher

France

1934

Antonin Magne

France

1935

Romain Maes

Belgium

1936

Silvere Maes

Belgium

1937

Roger Lapebie

France

1938

Gino Bartali

Italy

1939

Silvere Maes

Belgium

1940

No Tour

World War II

1941

No Tour

World War II

1942

No Tour

World War II

1943

No Tour

World War II

1944

No Tour

World War II

1945

No Tour

World War II

1946

No Tour

World War II

1947

Jean Robic

France

1948

Gino Bartali

Italy

1949

Fausto Coppi

Italy

1950

Ferdi Kubler

Switzerland

1951

Hugo Koblet

Switzerland

1952

Fausto Coppi

Italy

1953

Louison Bobet

France

1954

Louison Bobet

France

1955

Louison Bobet

France

1956

Roger Walkowiak

France

1957

Jacques Anquetil

France

1958

Charly Gaul

Luxembourg

1959

Federico Bahamontes

Spain

1960

Gastone Nencini

Italy

1961

Jacques Anquetil

France

1962

Jacques Anquetil

France

1963

Jacques Anquetil

France

1964

Jacques Anquetil

France

1965

Felice Gimondi

Italy

1966

Lucien Aimar

France

1967

Roger Pingeon

France

1968

Jan Janssen

Netherlands

1969

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

1970

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

1971

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

1972

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

1973

Luis Ocana

Spain

1974

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

1975

Bernard Thevenet

France

1976

Lucien van Impe

Belgium

1977

Bernard Thevenet

France

1978

Bernard Hinault

France

1979

Bernard Hinault

France

1980

Joop Zoetemelk

Netherlands

1981

Bernard Hinault

France

1982

Berbard Hinualt

France

1983

Laurent Fignon

France

1984

Laurent Fignon

France

1985

Bernard Hinualt

France

1986

Greg Lemond

United States

1987

Stephen Roche

Ireland

1988

Pedro Delgado

Spain

1989

Greg Lemond

United States

1990

Greg Lemond

United States

1991

Miguel Indurain

Spain

1992

Miguel Indurain

Spain

1993

Miguel Indurain

Spain

1994

Miguel Indurain

Spain

1995

Miguel Indurain

Spain

1996

Bjarne Riis

Denmark

1997

Jan Ulrich

Germany

1998

Marco Pantani

Italy

1999

Lance Armstrong

United States

2000

Lance Armstrong

United States

2001

Lance Armstrong

United States

2002

Lance Armstrong

United States

2003

Lance Armstrong

United States

2004

Lance Armstrong

United States

2005

Lance Armstrong

United States

2006

*Oscar Pereiro

Spain

2007

Alberto Contador

Spain

2008

Carlos Sastre

Spain

*Due to drug use Oscar Pereiro declared winner. Floyd Landis, before testing positive for drugs was first in 89hr 39min 30sec.

Tour de France - History

In 1903, the first Tour-a 2,428-kilometer affair split into six stages seemed far fetched at best, little more than a marketing coup for their sports newspaper L'Auto. The 1903 event saw 60 riders travelling 2,500 kilometres during 19 days on the basic cycle machinery of the day, with no convenient breaks for sleep. Competitors were expected to ride through the night. The 1904 Tour was almost the last one with the cheating that went on. In 1905, the stages were shortened in an effort to cut down on the long night stages. The Ballon d'Alsace was added, becoming the first major climb of the event. In 1910 the tour goes through the Pyrenees for the first time. The Tour is not held rom 1915-18 because of the First World War. With the return of the Tour in 1919, the yellow jersey is used to identify the overall leader. The color yellow is chosen because it's the same color as the newspaper l'Auto, the race sponsor. Eugene Christophe of France is the first rider to ever wear the yellow jersey on July 18, 1919. In 1930 the race is reformated with competators organizined into national teams and the Tour is opened to other advertisers. It's also the year of the first live radio broadcasts. In 1937 the use of three-speed derailleurs is allowed. No Tour during the war years of 1940-46. In 1952 and 1953 , two of the most famous climbs of the tour, the Ventoux and the Alpe-d'Huez at 1,912 meters (6272.89 feet) and 1,860 meters (6,102.288 feet) respectively, are added to the tour. In 1953, France's Louison Bobet's marks the tour's 50th anniversary with the first of three consecutive wins. In 1961 the Tour returns to sponsored teams. In 1975 the Tour de France finishes along the Champs Elysees for the first time. In 1986 Greg LeMond becomes the first American to win the tour. In 1997 Uzbekistan's Dshamolidin Abdushparov becomes the first rider to be disqualified from the tour for taking banned substances.